Tag Archives: Seanan McGuire

2015 Reading

My title is a lie, actually — this is a list of books I’ve read since Readercon in July of 2015, and it’s only the ones that are Hugo-nominable. If it didn’t come out in 2015, it doesn’t make this list because I want to focus on what can be nominated for a Hugo right now.

The Galaxy Game by Karen Lord

Half-Resurrection Blues & Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older

An Inheritance of Ashes by Leah Bobet

Lex Talionis by RSA Garcia

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

The Just City by Jo Walton

Updraft by Fran Wilde

House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard

Of Noble Family by Mary Robinette Kowal

Pocket Apocalypse and Red-Rose Chain by Seanan McGuire

Book of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor

Grace of Kings by Ken Liu

Time Salvager by Wes Chu

Court of Fives by Kate Elliott

Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear

Only Ever Yours & Asking For It by Louise O’Neill

The Fifth Season by NK Jemisin

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie

Last First Snow by Max Gladstone

Uprooted by Naomi Novick

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee

Cold Iron by Stina Leicht

Chimera by Mira Grant

Revision by Andrea Phillips

The Sin-Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Deceptions by Kelley Armstrong

The Sculptor by Scott McCloud

Bitch Planet by Kelly Sue DeConnick

Stand Still Stay Silent by Minna Sundberg

Collected Fiction by Hannu Rajaniemi (short story “Skywalker” is Hugo-nominable)

The Otherling & other stories by Anne Leinonen (short story “The Skinner” is Hugo-nominable)

Angels & Exiles by Yves Meynard (short story “The Song of the Mermaid” is Hugo-nominable)

Falling in Love with Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson (short story “Men Sell Not Such in Any Town” is Hugo-nominable, I think?)

Stories For Chip (full of short stories that are Hugo-nominable)

Octavia’s Brood (full of short stories that are Hugo-nominable)

Queers destroy SF (full of short stories that are Hugo-nominable)

 

I don’t want to get into any reviews or details, at this point, because I don’t really have the time and I don’t know if I’m up for it. I read all of these things, however, and thought they were magnificent and (so far as I’m aware) Hugo-nominable.

 

Other things & stuff:

Maija Peitikainen and Petri Hiltunen did the bid art for Helsinki in 2017, Hugo-nominable under fan artists.

Christopher Jones does amazing work for art for Convergence and is Hugo-nominable.

Nisi Shawl, Bill Campbell, and Carl Engel-Laird are all Hugo-nominable editors, so far as I can discern.

The Finnish fanzine MARVIN (published sometimes in Finnish and sometimes in English) is Hugo-nominable this year. This is the same crew of people who brought us the brilliant and needed articles about the shortage of evil villain bases of operation. We may need to rent co-working space in future, apparently.

 

 

Okay, I lied again, because I don’t want to lose track of what little I managed to track reading this year…

Things I read that aren’t 2015 Hugo-nominable, but that I still tracked:

(The Younger Gods, Michael Underwood, 2014)

(First three novels in the Ex Libris series by Jim C. Hines)

(How to Suppress Women’s Writing by Joanna Russ)

(Too Like the Lightning & Seven Surrenders by Ada Palmer — 2016 books)

(Unspeakable Things by Laurie Penny)

(Story of Your Life by Ted Chiang)

(A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan)

(Omens & Visions by Kelley Armstrong)

(Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie)

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Surviving a Zombie Apocalypse in Helsinki?

I’ve been helping out at the info tables for the Helsinki in 2017 bid for Worldcon a lot this summer, and this means I’ve heard some very interesting questions posed!  After visiting Helsinki several times in the past two years, I feel more prepared to answer questions than some volunteers.  I have to admit, though, I don’t know it all.  The question that stumped me the most this month was … “What happens if there’s a zombie attack in Helsinki during the Worldcon?”

R from Warm Bodies

This zombie might eat your heart out …

That seems more likely to happen then than at any other time, honestly, and I have to admit, after reading several Seanan McGuire books, I can’t say I’m not afraid of a ‪‎zombie‬ attack … particularly after seeing photographic proof of a Mika Loponen zombie in the Helsinki‬ area

So! Research time! Here are some resources I’ve found for if there’s a zombie attack in Helsinki during Worldcon!

Here are some reasons why it’d be relatively easy to weather a zombie attack in Helsinki.

It’s very important to figure out if it’s a real zombie. Safely, if possible, determine whether it might be someone alive participating in a zombie walk, like this nice individual.

You might want to make sure it’s not a practical joke, (whether or not it’s April 1st) …

Be particularly cautious if you might be dealing with a zombie Viking‬ (they might just be participating in a LARP) …

And our Canadian friends have been teaching Zombie Survival Camp for a few years now, apparently!

I didn’t actually find much in the way of a plan from the city of Helsinki in the case of a zombie attack. Anyone care to add info (or write something up), so we can build it into the next iteration of our FAQ? We can’t possibly be prepared for all potential issues we might face at Worldcon if we win … but this one seems too fun a question to let slide by!

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Reading Now (or Soon), and Psyched For It

On the one hand, telling people what I’m reading or about to be reading is a sure way to start a conversation.  On the other hand, telling the internet what I’m reading when I converse with so many authors is a little worrisome.  If you read this list, and if you’re an author, and if you’re not on this list, please assume it’s because I didn’t remember to list that amazing book you’ve written?  (Always attribute to stupidity before attributing to intention …)

That said, here’s what I’m reading or about to read:

The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson.  Someone I’ve met through Readercon, Alaya’s always seemed very nice in person.  Her book is what I’m actively reading *right this second*.  It’s really, really good so far.  This book is nominated for the new YA Award at Detcon, and I’m a sucker for YA.  Aside from that, though, it’s a novel about future Brazil and technology and a society ruled by centuries-old women.  What’s not to love?

The True Deceiver by Tove Jansson.  Tove Jansson is a famous Finn for her Moomin Family characters, and I love those adventures too, but Jansson apparently wrote several adult novels.  This one was only translated into English this past year, so I decided to grab a copy (and bought several extras to give away at events for Helsinki in 2017).

Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor.  This book is officially not yet available in the US, but it’s already out in the UK, so I was determined to get my copy.  Nigeria and alien encounters — how could I miss this?  I *loved* Who Fears Death (despite the book alternatively scaring the shit out of me and making me cry).  I had the privilege to listen to Nnedi read from that novel when she won the Carl Brandon Award for it in 2010 or 2011.  Basically, after that, I had to read everything obtainable written by Nnedi.

Systems Fail by Hiromi Goto and N.K. Jemisin.  These two amazing women were the guests of honor at Wiscon 38 this spring, and they both had amazing guest of honor speeches.  If you haven’t read them yet, do so now:  Nora Jemisin’s speech here and Hiromi Goto’s speech here.  You can now understand why a book of fiction, essays, and interviews by these two women is high on my list of things to be read.

My Real Children by Jo Walton.  I love imagining the road not taken.  A book about two roads possible, colliding into one reality?  I love this concept.  Can’t wait to read this book.

The Girls at the Kingfisher Club by Genevieve Valentine.  I am embarrassed to admit that the only words of Valentine’s that I’ve read are her blog and twitter posts.  I am very much looking forward to this book, a story of twelve sisters, dancing, and fairy tales.

Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowal.  I’ve been tearing through this series like there’s no tomorrow.  And perhaps there isn’t a tomorrow!  What will happen next to the “glamorous” Vincents?  What new scientific/magical discovery will save the day?  These books are addictive.  Fourth book in the series.  I think I read the first three over the course of four days.

The Best of All Possible Worlds by Karen Lord.  Karen was the Guest of Honor at Acon 7  this spring, and I spent several amazing hours conversing with her about Worldcon, science fiction, the universe, and everything.  I am psyched to read her book, and hope it’ll be even half as great as talking with her in person was.  The reading she did at Acon was amazing.

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch.  I know Scott through Readercon and Worldcon, but I’ve been hearing about his books forever.  It’s time to take the plunge!  I look forward to this adventure, and hope Scott isn’t reading this, because then he’ll know that I haven’t yet read his books.  I look forward to having an informed opinion by the time I see him next!

Indexing by Seanan McGuire.  I *think* I’ve read everything else that Seanan has written.  Maybe.  She’s so damn prolific!  It’s hard to be sure if I’ve caught it all.  This book is a new urban fantasy which turns fairy tales into reality.  Totally my cup of tea.  🙂

Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond, edited by Bill Campbell and Edward Austin Hall.  I met Bill Campbell while at Wiscon 38, and we got to talking about Afrofuturism.  I actually don’t know the second thing about Afrofuturism, it turns out, and since my friend Pablo is running the Afrofuturism track at Detcon, it behooves me to read this book very quickly.  So I can hopefully not be an idiot in the future.

The Lascar’s Dagger by Glenda Larke.  I met Glenda while at Worldcon in Australia (I know! I got to go! It was awesome!).  She’s an Aussie author whose Watergiver series definitely hooked me that summer.  I’m psyched she has a book out in 2014, and had to obtain it as soon as I heard.

Ghost Train to New Orleans by Mur Lafferty.  Travel guides for the undead, and New Orleans.  I’m totally there.

Salsa Nocturna Stories by Daniel Jose Older.  I’ve had the privilege of listening to Daniel read stories at Readercon and at a party for Helsinki at Wiscon.  They are creepy, and honest, and completely engrossing.  I’m really looking forward to reading the printed work, although I may have to read it aloud to myself, now.  😉

Three Parts Dead and Two Serpents Rise by Max Gladstone.  He writes interesting things online (his blog is a good read).  He attended Vericon this year and seemed cool.  Plus I offered to have tea with him on Twitter.  That deal probably only works after I’ve read his books.  Luckily for me, his books are about killing gods.  Sounds awesome to me!

Servant of the Underworld by Aliette de Bodard.  Here’s another person whose words I love online (and I talk with her on Twitter; she’s cool!).  I just have somehow not yet read her work in print.  This is going to change, and soon.  I obtained this book last week, and I am psyched to read about Aliette’s Aztec murder mysteries and gods walking the streets.  I just hope she’ll forgive me for not reading it before now!

New Amsterdam by Elizabeth Bear.  This book is from 2008, so I’m almost certainly the last person to be reading it, but I confess my sins and my intention to repent.  Well, inasmuch as reading this book could be considered at all the opposite of sin.  😉

Great People Decisions by Claudio Fernandez Araoz.  I bought this book for professional reasons, and put it aside for a while, but find that the more I work with volunteer teams, the more I’m thinking about what I read in it.  So I need to actually finish the book.  Nonfiction isn’t usually my cup of tea, but this is important stuff.

 

What else is in my library?  You can always look at my books on Librarything.com, although maybe that’s only accessible if you log in.  Anyway, I have updated the fiction section (tagged “entertainment room” for locating purposes) pretty recently.  The children’s lit section has a few more piles to be added, and the reference and nonfiction books are not really up-to-date at all.  Baby steps, I guess.

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2013 Scifi and Fantasy Novel Reading

What have I read this year that was published this year, in the scifi and fantasy genres?  Seems like it’s about time to start keeping track, in order to be able to nominate for Hugos in a few months…

2013 Books I’ve Read:

Parasite by Mira Grant

Chimes at Midnight and Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire

The Girl Who Soared Over Fairyland and Cut the Moon in Two by Cat Valente

You by Austin Grossman

Madd Addam by Margaret Atwood

Bread and Wine: An Erotic Tale of New York by Samuel R. Delany

 

Still to read, but clearly on the list of things to read:

The Rabbit Back Literature Society by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen

Sculptor’s Daughter: A Childhood Memoir by Tove Jansson (which my copy says was published for the first time in English in 2013; I’m confused by Amazon saying 2014)

Okay, that’s not nearly enough reading.  Time to catch up!  What else should I have read in 2013?

Sadly, The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin, The Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi, and Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor were published prior to 2013.  They were really fantastic books, though!  I’m sad to have missed them when first they were published.

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